north kent marshes archaeological significance study (1991)/greater thames estuary research framework (1999)

Prepared a comprehensive review of archaeology associated with the Kent Thames marshes. Described a sequence of archaeological horizons spanning the Late glacial and Holocene period, culminating with the extant landscapes shaped by historic grazing marsh, flood defences, industrial extraction, ship building and military defenses.

Served as a member of the Greater Thames Estuary Archaeological Steering Committee responsible for drawing up an archaeological research framework across the joint jurisdictions of separate archaeological advisory services in Kent, Essex and Greater London.

 

This framework built on the North Kent Marshes Study to establish a coherent approach to research in one of the great European estuaries. It  considered archaeological and historic structures across the terrestrial, intertidal and marine domains. 

 

This served to direct research and underpin curatorial decision making for a decade during which large infrastructure projects, coastal development and coastline management programmes required a substantial uplift in the delivery of archaeological and other investigations.